A Little Post About The Post-Apocalypse

Anyone that knows anything about end of the world knows that our imminent demise is fast approaching. That’s right, humans—on that fateful winter solstice day of December 21st, 2012 at precisely 11:12 UTC (personally, I’ve taken the day off) we will find out why the Mayan calendar ends. Some say the Mayans predicted the end of this epoch and the start of a new, “Yay new!” or “Boo, we are all going to die!” Interpret how you wish, but in the case of our Alien Workshop KTC series, we’ve braced ourselves for the latter.

Each board depicts a possible death-by-an-apocalypse scenario. Whether it’s death by alien invasion, nuclear fallout, or natural disaster, we have your skate graphics covered. Each board comes with a propaganda-like guide entitled 2012, So You’re an Apocalypse Survivor. There’s a limited batch of Alien Workshop branded apocalypse-proof steel cans that has all three board designs packed safely inside for all your bug out needs. We posted a few detail photos over on Facebook.

To get the word out, we have sent mysterious letters asking a chosen few to continue the mission: to ensure skateboarding post-apocalypse. Alien Workshop is even burying five canisters around the planet for the lucky living to find—hidden away from abduction beams, radiation, and known fault lines, of course. Check out the video we made below for a hint to the whereabouts of the first one.

Working on this project was a dream come true because: 1. I have apocalypse dreams all the time and 2. I grew up on skateboard culture. I would hang out every day after school at my local skate shop thinking, “Dude, how sick would it be to, like—do a board graphic!”  And Alien Workshop! With their love for Dayton and conspiracy theories, we were in alignment like the planets on apocalypse-eve. So suffice it to say, I will love this project until the end of time…or longer.

2012 Apocalypse Series by Alien Workshop and Real Art from Real Art on Vimeo.

Via: RealArt Blog
Written By: Crystal Dennis

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Melvin the Magical Mixed Media Machine

Melvin the Machine is best described as a Rube Goldberg machine with a twist. Besides doing what Rube Goldbergs do best – performing a simple task as inefficiently as possible, often in the form of a chain reaction – Melvin has an identity. Actually, the only purpose of this machine is promoting its own identity.

Melvin, who was created by Dutch Studio, HEYHEYHEY, takes pictures and makes video’s of his audience which he instantly uploads to his blog, Facebook and Twitter account. Besides that he also makes his own merchandise. The whole crazy process happens in about four minutes!

Via: ThePreSurfer

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Milky Way over Switzerland

This magnificent photo taken in Switzerland shows the expanse of the Milky Way galaxy across the heavens. This small size really doesn’t do it justice; click here to view a much larger image. Hovering over the photo at the link will also point out major star clusters and nebulae.

Via: Neatorama | Photo: Stephane Vetter

The Santa Claw

Have you ever wondered what happens to Santa’s leftover gifts? The ones that never appeared on Christmas wish lists. Well…nothing. Until now. This year the Fat Man sent his friends at Real Art all the unused presents, and we gave them a home in The Santa Claw.

Yep we said claw. We built the biggest claw game ever. And you—or anyone in the entire world—can play the game from your own computer. Best part…if you win, we’ll send the leftover Santa goodies straight to your door.

Visit www.thesantaclaw.com for all the details. Check out the prizes, leather chaps, Dokken records, hand-held crossbows, t-shirts, Lenticular Sacred Heart Jesus, games, balls, models, scooters, skateboards and much much more. Log in now, create your customized avatar and be prepared for a clawsome good time!

Downtown Dayton’s Renovated Space Odyssey

Below is an excerpt from Dayton Creative Syndicate’s Creative Crux article “Downtown Dayton’s Renovated Space Odyssey” by Marisa Becker.

This article features a look at the creative workplaces of four local creative companies; Visual Marketing Associates, Real Art Design Group, Forge Design and Hafenbrack Marketing Company and takes a look at how these companies have re-purposed existing structures to create new and exciting offices in Downtown Dayton.

Forge's wonderful stained glass window

It’s a cycle that has repeated itself in many urban areas across the country: the downtown core starts suffering, real estate prices go down, creative professionals take advantage of deals on great old spaces and fix them up, and the newly vibrant neighborhoods and valuable properties in turn attract businesses and residents back to downtown.

Four creative businesses in Dayton have taken the first steps to start revitalizing Dayton, beginning from the ground up by adapting existing downtown spaces to fit their needs. And while they’ve all taken different approaches, they seem to agree on one thing: in this market, it’s foolish not to invest in downtown Dayton.

Please visit: http://www.creativesyndicate.org/blog/creative-crux to read the rest of this super article and see all of the wonderful pictures of these amazing creative spaces.

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Dave Anthony toasts his achievement after driving his big-wheeled GMC Jimmy onto the roof of a friend’s soon-to-be demolished house at 22118 West Valley Highway in Kent.  Anthony, 39, from Union, Washington, noted that it was a “hell of a way to kick off the Memorial Day weekend.”

The Cottingley Fairies

The first of the five photographs, shows Frances Griffiths with the alleged fairies.

The Cottingley Fairies appear in a series of five photographs taken by Elsie Wright and Frances Griffiths, two young cousins who lived in Cottingley, near Bradford in England. In 1917, when the first two photographs were taken, Elsie was 16 years old and Frances was 10. The pictures came to the attention of writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who used them to illustrate an article on fairies he had been commissioned to write for the Christmas 1920 edition of The Strand Magazine. Conan Doyle, as a Spiritualist, was enthusiastic about the photographs, and interpreted them as clear and visible evidence of psychic phenomena. Public reaction was mixed; some accepted that the images were genuine, but others believed they had been faked.

The second of the five photographs, shows Elsie Wright with a fairy.

Frances and the Leaping Fairy, the third of the five Cottingley Fairy photographs

Interest in the Cottingley Fairies gradually declined after 1921. Both girls grew up, married and lived abroad for a time. Yet, the photographs continued to hold the public’s imagination; in 1966 a reporter from the Daily Express newspaper tracked down Elsie, who had returned to the England. Elsie left open the possibility that she believed she had photographed her thoughts, and the media once again became interested in the story. In the early 1980s, both admitted that the photographs were faked using cardboard cutouts of fairies copied from a popular children’s book. Yet Frances continued to claim that the fifth and final photograph was genuine.

Fairy Offering Posy of Harebells to Elsie, the fourth of the photographs of the Cottingley Fairies

Fairies and Their Sun-Bath, is the fifth photograph of the Cottingley Fairies

The photographs and two of the cameras used are on display in the National Media Museum in Bradford.

Via: Wikipedia.com

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