EVIL DEAD 2 – ROTOSCOPED!

Rotoscoping is a tedious process that involves animating over a live action film frame by frame, which means it took waaaaaay too long to rotoscope this trailer for the horror classic The Evil Dead.

And, while the end result is pretty cool looking and fun to watch, it’s highly unlikely that PFR Studios will be rotoscoping any more of the film, because this bit is almost three years old!

Via: Neatorama / ToplessRobot

Ro-Bros Goes Live

Our two prototypes are formidable machines, each with incredible force and precision. Plus, they’re 100% B.A. But only one of the Ro-Bros can reign supreme. To determine the winner, we need your help.

On February 1, 2012, Today we released our Ro-Bros to the public for their final test… the Ro-Bros will be controlled by YOU in a three-week battle at Ro-Bros.com. If our calculations are correct, it’ll be epic.

Follow the Ro-Bros on Facebook or Twitter for further notices and start training your fingers to hit those arrow keys because on 2.1.12, today, it’s time to put up your virtual dukes and throw down, Ro-Bros style.

Visit the site, log-in, customize your avatar, and start exploring the Ro-Bro Laboratories by checking out the prototypes, the technology, the fight stats and of course the restricted lab test videos. You can also enter the live stream on Level 8 to see what techniques other A & B-Bot pilots are performing.

The Battle Begins…

Remember last year, when we built the world’s largest claw game and invited everyone to play online? The response was amazing—over 100,000 people played from all over the world. The Santa Claw even spent a week in the Gizmodo Gallery in NYC. Since we packed it all up, people have been asking what’s next.

Well, this year the Real Art team is elbows-deep in advanced robotic engineering. In our secret underground lab, we have been developing devices decades ahead of our time. We are finally ready to reveal The Ro-Bros, developed side by side with technology never before seen outside our labs. Our two prototypes are formidable machines, each with incredible force and precision. Plus, they’re 100% B.A.

But only one of the Ro-Bros can reign supreme. To determine the winner, we need your help.

On February 1, 2012, we will release the Ro-Bros to the public for their final test… the Ro-Bros will be controlled by you in a three-week battle at Ro-Bros.com. If our calculations are correct, it’ll be epic.

Follow the Ro-Bros on Facebook or Twitter for further notices and start training your fingers to hit those arrow keys because on 2.1.12, it’s time to put up your virtual dukes and throw down, Ro-Bros style.

Via: RealArtBlog

The Voynich Manuscript

Written in Central Europe at the end of the 15th or during the 16th century, the origin, language, and date of the Voynich Manuscript—named after the Polish-American antiquarian bookseller, Wilfrid M. Voynich, who acquired it in 1912—are still being debated as vigorously as its puzzling drawings and undeciphered text. Described as a magical or scientific text, nearly every page contains botanical, figurative, and scientific drawings of a provincial but lively character, drawn in ink with vibrant washes in various shades of green, brown, yellow, blue, and red.

Based on the subject matter of the drawings, the contents of the manuscript falls into six sections:
1) botanicals containing drawings of 113 unidentified plant species;
2) astronomical and astrological drawings including astral charts with radiating circles, suns and moons, Zodiac symbols such as fish (Pisces), a bull (Taurus), and an archer (Sagittarius), nude females emerging from pipes or chimneys, and courtly figures;
3) a biological section containing a myriad of drawings of miniature female nudes, most with swelled abdomens, immersed or wading in fluids and oddly interacting with interconnecting tubes and capsules;
4) an elaborate array of nine cosmological medallions, many drawn across several folded folios and depicting possible geographical forms;
5) pharmaceutical drawings of over 100 different species of medicinal herbs and roots portrayed with jars or vessels in red, blue, or green, and
6) continuous pages of text, possibly recipes, with star-like flowers marking each entry in the margins.

History of the Collection
Like its contents, the history of ownership of the Voynich manuscript is contested and filled with some gaps. The codex belonged to Emperor Rudolph II of Germany (Holy Roman Emperor, 1576-1612), who purchased it for 600 gold ducats and believed that it was the work of Roger Bacon. It is very likely that Emperor Rudolph acquired the manuscript from the English astrologer John Dee (1527-1608). Dee apparently owned the manuscript along with a number of other Roger Bacon manuscripts. In addition, Dee stated that he had 630 ducats in October 1586, and his son noted that Dee, while in Bohemia, owned “a booke…containing nothing butt Hieroglyphicks, which booke his father bestowed much time upon: but I could not heare that hee could make it out.” Emperor Rudolph seems to have given the manuscript to Jacobus Horcicky de Tepenecz (d. 1622), an exchange based on the inscription visible only with ultraviolet light on folio 1r which reads: “Jacobi de Tepenecz.” Johannes Marcus Marci of Cronland presented the book to Athanasius Kircher (1601-1680) in 1666. In 1912, Wilfred M. Voynich purchased the manuscript from the Jesuit College at Frascati near Rome. In 1969, the codex was given to the Beinecke Library by H. P. Kraus, who had purchased it from the estate of Ethel Voynich, Wilfrid Voynich’s widow.

For a complete look at all the Voynich catalog’s pages visit Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Libraries Slideshow here.  You can also read a detailed chemical analysis of the Voynich Manuscript here.

Via: BoingBoing & Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

American Gothic Models


American Gothic is a painting by Grant Wood, in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago. Wood’s inspiration came from a cottage designed in the Gothic Revival style with a distinctive upper window and a decision to paint the house along with ‘the kind of people I fancied should live in that house.’

The painting shows a farmer standing beside his spinster daughter (not his wife, as so many parodies and references assume). The figures were modeled by the artist’s dentist and his sister.

Via: The PreSurfer

Santa Claw Merchandise

Hey readers as always thanks for visiting and reading Circa71. I wanted to invite you all to take a bit to check out the cool stuff over at Real Mart.

What’s Real Mart you say? Well the Real Art gang built an online Real Mart store to bring you the very best of our handcrafted products.

And now we have Santa Claw goodies! That’s right if you just can’t get enough of The Santa Claw then Real Mart is the place for you. Of course if you’re going to play a giant claw machine you need one of our giant Santa Claw tokens. Or maybe one of the cool Claw t-shirts are more your flavor.

With fun slogans like; I Fought the Claw and the Claw won, I played The Claw and all I got was this crappy t-shirt, Claw is for lovers, Clawsome, I <3 Claw, Biggest Claw ever, Balls, and I grabbed some balls in The Claw, you’re sure to find the perfect fit. More items will be available soon so hopefully you’ll enjoy the variety of goods that Real Mart offers and you’ll come back time and time again to see what’s new.

Or head on over to our Real Art blog for some fun Santa Claw freebies; such as phone backgrounds, desktops and ringtones.

More information:
The Santa Claw @ Circa71
The Santa Claw, the official site
Real Art Design Group, Inc.
Twitter: @TheSantaClaw
Facebook: thesantaclaw

For more information about The Claw please contact: info@thesantaclaw.com

Exploring the Mysterious Portolan Maps

Section of the amazingly accurate 1559 map by Mateo Prunes.

One of the most mysterious topics in world history concerns a handful of maps depicting the world’s geography with a precision that far exceeded the tools and abilities of the day’s mapmakers. The Library of Congress convened a conference, “Re-Examining the Portolan Chart: History, Navigation and Science” to discuss maps originating about 1275.

According to today’s Washington Post: It is a rare representative of one of the world’s greatest and most enduring mysteries: Where and how did medieval mapmakers, apparently armed with no more than a compass, an hourglass and sets of sailing directions, develop stunningly accurate maps of southern Europe, the Black Sea and North African coastlines, as if they were looking down from a satellite, when no one had been higher than a treetop?

The earliest known portolan (PORT-oh-lawn) chart, the Carta Pisana, just appears in about 1275 — with no known predecessors. It is perhaps the first modern scientific map and contrasted sharply to the “mappamundi” of the era, the colorful maps with unrecognizable geography and fantastic creatures and legends. It bears no resemblance to the methods of the mathematician Ptolemy and does not use measurements of longitude and latitude.

And yet, despite it’s stunning accuracy, the map “seems to have emerged full-blown from the seas it describes,” one reference journal notes. No one today knows who made the first maps, or how they calculated distance so accurately, or even how all the information came to be compiled.

While maps such as the Carta Pisana are indeed worthy of in-depth research, I’m also drawn to even more mysterious examples, such as the Piri Reis map from 1513, which has been the topic of a couple of books, the most fun ~ even if perhaps not the most accurate ~ being Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings, first published by Charles Hapgood in 1966.

Dexter Posters

After Lost concluded Ty Mattson of Mattson Creative became a big fan of Showtime’s hit series Dexter. He was so inspired that he created one poster design for each of the first four seasons – highlighting the iconic moments from the show.

You can follow him on Twitter or check his blog and or more information about a limited print run and their availability.

American Pop-star, Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, American painter, sculptor, and printmaker, startled the art world in 1962 by exhibiting paintings based on comic book cartoons. From his studio in New York City, Roy Lichtenstein did cartoon inspired paintings that helped launch the Pop Art movement. He was unique in that he developed a new visual language in an avant-garde style that was disruptive to viewers and yet was accessible and popular with them. He also did innovative art work that incorporated many late 20th-century movements and addressed a number of social issues.

His thirty-five year career of public recognition was celebrated in 1993-94 by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York with a large scale retrospective of his work.

Born in Manhattan Roy went to high school there. By age 14, he was taking art classes at the Parsons School of Design and also studied briefly with Reginald Marsh at the Art Students League in 1939. He then attended Ohio State University where his major influence was Hoyt Sherman, whose figure-ground relationships inspired Lichtenstein’s treatment of cliche subjects.

In 1943, he was drafted into the Army and served in Europe and then returned to Ohio State, completing his BFA and MFA and then teaching at that campus. From Cleveland, Ohio, he made frequent trips to New York and started to exhibit there in 1949. In the 1950s, he used various techniques of Abstract Expressionism, did figurative work, and like many of his generation, began employing pop art images. But he was searching for a style.

In 1957, he left Cleveland to teach at New York University in Oswego, New York, and in 1961, he began teaching at Rudgers University, where one of his colleagues, Allan Kaprow, used cartoon figures. Through Kaprow, he met many renegade New York artists including Claes Oldenburg and Jim Dine.

In 1962, he had a landmark exhibition at the Castelli Gallery that showed enlarged depictions of advertisements and comic strip images. In fact, it was gallery owner Leo Castelli who, as a major promoter of the contemporary art scene, was a key person in launching Roy’s career.

Although Lichtenstein’s pop paintings had widespread popular acceptance, he began in 1965 to do Abstract Expressionism, but in contrast to others in that style, he did work that was hard and static. In the 1990s, he did large-scale abstract interiors, and he also worked in ceramics and enamelled steel.

Throughout his career, he appeared in many documentary films and did posters for entertainments including Bill Clinton’s United States presidential campaign. Lichtenstein’s murals are in Dusseldorf, Germany; Tel Aviv, Israel; and New York City. He died unexpectedly on September 29, 1997, from viral pneumonia, having worked until the time of his death.

Via: jewishvirtuallibrary.org

Get More Traction from Your Creative Career

Via: Dayton Creative Syndicatetraction_poster

How do you translate exuberant creative energy into a viable career with big-name brands? Find out Tuesday, Sept. 21, as DCS and the school of advertising art welcome Tony Neary and Tom Kisker from Cincinnati’s own Traction. The session kicks off at 6 p.m. at saa.

A founding partner of Traction as well as a talented designer and illustrator, Tony Neary has led creative development for multiple P&G brands as well as several national and global brands including Dave’s Gourmet, MeadWestvaco and Coca-Cola. The plan of launching Traction came to fruition in early 2007. Although, the contingency plan of enrolling in rodeo clown school is still a viable option.

WHO: Tony Neary, Traction
WHEN: Tuesday, Sept. 21
TIME: 6-7:30 p.m.
WHERE: saa
PRICE: $10 members, $20 non-members (join today!), $5 students (with valid student ID)

Click here to reserve your spot.